Tag Archives: DNS

IPv6-HE-to-Tomato

Get connected with IPv6

 

The Internet 2.0

Internet Service Providers like AT&T are slowly providing IPv6 service to their customers, but if your ISP doesn’t currently assign your household a public IPv6 address then you’ll need the help of a tunnel broker to get you connected. Why is getting connected to the IPv6 internet that important?  Honestly, for casual users, its not.  But geeks know that some things are only available if your home network has an IPv6 address.  Whether you just want to finally see the dancing kame, or you want access to some of the IPv6-only goodies like free usenet servers, the following guide will get you started creating your first 6in4 or protocol 41 tunnels.  Read more to find out how to get your home network off the IPv4 island and connected to the internet 2.0.

Continue reading

AT&T Deathstar

Working with Uverse and DNS. Part 1 – Installation and Testing

Help for new customers, and a first week review of AT&T Uverse.

Too big to function

When AT&T announced that they were bringing Uverse service to my neck of the woods,  I found myself checking their availability web page more often than I checked my old rusted mailbox. It was only a matter of time before my dreams of tripled internet speed came true.  I’m pretty sure I simultaneously shouted in joy, signed up for service, and possibly peed – just a little. I’m a bit ashamed, but how else can I explain it? For a techie, the anticipation created by “faster internets” is equal to a junkie knowing he is about to triple his supply. It was probably that same geeky-level of anticipation that made AT&T’s gloriously botched install job all the more painful. In typical “too-big-to-function” fashion, it took no more than two “IP-DSL tier 2″ tech-support phone calls, five on-site tech visits, and ten days of waiting before they finally got me up and running.  Not exactly smooth transition from DSL, but I was confident that together AT&T and I could thaw that icy start into water under the bridge.  All I needed to do was witness my first Uverse-delivered web page.  Continue reading